Chef

Chef

Chef: Independent Film and Great Startup Film Independent films seem to be delivering the best storylines and most complete character development in film these days, and Chef by  Jon Favreau continues the tradition. The brainchild of Jon Favreau, Jon wrote, directed, and starred in the primary role of Chef Carl Casper. In addition to Carl Casper we are treated to great performances by John Leguizamo as his best friend and sou chef, Martin, and Emjay Anthony, who plays Favreau’s son turn in equally impressive performances for a delighted audience. The story of a promising young chef, who is no longer young, and who is turning stagnant in Dustin Hoffman’s pleasant but predictable restaurant, Jon Favreau has been pushing away his son as well as his creativity. However, things are about to change. His ex-wife urges him to get a food truck from a friend of hers, a cameo performance by Robert Downey Jr., and after a public meltdown made even more public by social media, Carl finally takes the leap. His best friend Martin leaps right along with him, as they go back to the Cuban roots of the area. Chef: Do What you Love – Startup Film The movie turns into the untimate start up film, as Chef Casper tests his Cuban fare in his food truck, El Hefe, with groups in Florida, and then winds his way across the U.S. his son and Martin by his side. Carl learns how important social media marketing is from his tech savvy son, and his son learns how important doing the right thing for the customer is from his Dad. Chef is about passion, and finding your place...
My Lucky Elephant

My Lucky Elephant

Every now and again, I have the pleasure to review a great little family film that tells an interesting story, and teaches kids something along the way. My Lucky Elephant is one of those films. The film starts out by introducing us to a young boy who has lost his father, and a young elephant who has been separated from its family. The two of them cautiously get to know each other, and the boy trains the elephant to understand his directions. This is Thailand, and the boy knows that they have to work if they are going to survive. Over and over, the boy and his elephant are turned away as too small, until he finally doesn’t take no for an answer and he proves that he can work hard. Unfortunately, the Thai lumber industry hasn’t seen the Lorax, and soon there are no more trees to cut down in the area, so there is no longer any work. Once again the boy and his elephant, Lucky, have to move on to see if they can find some other type of work. Thailand has a tough economy with little support for orphaned kids. This film gives young children a bit of a taste for how hard it is in other countries when kids are on their own. We watch as Lucky and his friend are chased and harassed by police, drugged and attacked by poachers, and just try to stay alive in general. What everyone underestimates is the intelligence of Lucky and the deep friendship that has developed between him and his friend. The latter part of the...
The Words

The Words

I must admit that I was looking forward to The Words. The trailer intrigued me. In today’s world of bigger and louder action films, I find that I seek out some of the smaller ones that deal with quieter themes, such as ethics. Unfortunately, this particular movie did not deliver as much as I had hoped it would. With a pedigreed cast with Bradley Cooper, Jeremy Irons, Dennis Quaid, Olivia Wilde and Zoë Saldana, it was reasonable to think that The Words would deliver excellent performances in a tightly constructed mystery; instead The Words delivered a rather lackluster, at times, boring construction without a genuine spark of intrigue. For a film based around an ethical dilemma, there just wasn’t much tension built into it by the writing and directing team of Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal. I suppose their inexperience is showing in this production, although with a debut like this, them may not get another stab at directing. When the end of The Words finally arrived, it landed with a flat note. The audience seemed to just look around and think.. “Oh.. I guess it’s time to leave.” That final flat note pretty much summed up The Words… flat, and disappointing. I would recommend that you pass on The Words, and save the money for something with a little more life in it; something like a zombie film perhaps…. Cite this… (new...

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